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-span.org. >> john brennan unveiled unused counterterrorism strategy and pakistan -- on velde a and new counter-terrorism strategy on pakistan -- unveiled a new counterterrorism strategy for pakistan. this is about one hour, 50 minutes. >> have never heard it so quiet. that is a sense of our anticipation and excitement about our program today. we welcome you. many on and guests, dear student, faculty, others, we are pleased and honored to host john brennan, the assistant to the president for homeland security and terrorism -- counter- terrorism. it introduced are speaker, we have the perfect person right here in our community. prof. john mclaughlin is a member of our faculty, holding the position of distinguish practitioner at the philip merrill center for strategic studies. as many of you know, john had a highly distinguished career as a central event -- at the central intelligence agency. beginning in 1972 car racing to the rank of deputy director, acting director in two dozen for. no one could have a keener appreciation of the challenges facing our speaker every day. professor, prepared -- t
based in pakistan. these latest bombs have been described as relatively crude and possibly the work of local militants. whoever is behind them makes sure that india's city is still vulnerable. >> for more on today's violence, i spoke with the ambassador who formerly served as u.s. assistant secretary of state for south asian affairs. he is currently at the center for strategic and international studies. i started by asking who he thought could be behind the attacks. >> well, i know one thing, that mumbai, it is a very sad day for mumbai, the fourth attack in the last 10 years. this city has been attacked by terrorists on many occasions, and this is the latest episode. it does not appear to be the same nature of attack that occurred in november of 2008, the suicide bombers that attacked in mumbai, killing 166 people that were tied to the l.e.t., a pakistani-based militant group. this appears to be more sporadic. it does not appear to be the same kind of attack. india has seen these before by a group called north dakota and mehanna hedin. it is an indigenous group. they have done thes
"bbc world news america." a year after devastating rains ravitch pakistan, we return to the hardest-hit region to see how people are coping in the aftermath. -- a year after devastating rains ravage pakistan. one country right and the heart of europe appears to be a new to the currency crisis. switzerland's fanc is riding high and has become a safe haven for investors. >> this is a landscape that has attracted tourists for over a century. this year, visitors are staying on the ground. those that are here are counting their pennies. as the euro slides, the swiss franc rises and rises. foreign tourists find switzerland too expensive. meanwhile, the swiss are neglecting their on resorts in favor of a cheap holiday abroad. >> i am watching the situation with enormous concern. things have gotten worse. jobs and businesses are really in danger now and that is bad for our economy. >> the swiss franc is at an all- time high against the euro. a new study shows that a thousand hotels across the alps are threatened with closure. >> there will be job cuts. there has already been. each of the ho
and pakistan. with the help of pakistan. so i think that sometimes we just go from one end of greek allies, great friends which is what was your longtime, in the previous administration, two gosh, these guys are no good, et cetera. this is not the way to do business between two allies and partners. and i think we will not interpret the remarks as a letter. we understand them to be a reflection of american statement of policy, and the americans have the right to defend their homeland by ensuring that terrorists are plotting against the american homeland are dealt with. but as far as the other concern, we are very confident of our sovereignty. we would like to protect our sovereignty. and sovereignty requires that when operations take place in pakistan they should take place without knowledge and our participation. >> a quick follow. does that mean if there's a second rate, that your forces would fire on the rich? >> when i became ambassador to the united states, i went and saw very good colleague of mine, another professor of international, and i said i've been ambassador before but that wa
and pakistan. we must always be on our guard, but now, i am informed that this figure has been significantly reduced. in pakistan, osama bin laden has been killed and al qaeda is significantly weakens. in afghanistan, british and other forces have driven al qaeda from their bases, and while it is too early to tell for certain, initial evidence shows we have halted the certai suggests we halted the momentum of the talibannsurgency in its heartland. mr. speaker, we are entering a new phase in which the afghan forces will do more of the fighti and patrolling and our forces training and mentoring. as president obama said last month the mission is changing from, that to support. when we arrived there was no one to hand over to. no pper army or police. in many places across the country the afghan security forces now stand ready to begin the process of taking over security responsibility. success in afghanistan requires a number of critical steps. the first is making sure the afghan security forces are able to secure their own territory. there have been well known problems especially with the afgha
efforts with pakistan. currently the u.k. is the second-largest of the foreign military force in afghanistan. from london, this is just under an hour. >> thank you, mr. speaker. with permission i would like to make a statement on afghanistan. formerly i said this government has sought to take a more hard hit security based approach to the mission.vernment as i've said, we are not there to build a perfect democracy, still a model society.re yes, we will help with the detablishment of demographicild institutions and yes, we can improve infrastructure, develop education, encourage democrac development, but we are in afghanistan. we can improve infrastructure, develop education and encourage development the we are in afghanistan for one overriding reason, to shore our own national security by helping the afghans take control of theirs. that means building up security forces to drive down british combat forces where the afghans themselves able to prevent al qaeda from returning and posing a threat to us and our allies around the world. this is poignant today on a plot executed by a
is pakistan rebuilding after devastation? >> one country in the heart of europe appears to be immune to the currency crisis. switzerland's frank is rising high and it has become a haven for investors. how helpful is that in this economy? >> the landscape has attracted tourists for over a century. this year, visitors are counting their pennies. euro slides and the swiss franc rises. foreign tourists find switzerland too expensive. >> [speaking foreign language] >> i am watching the situation with enormous concern. things have gotten or sign the last few months. jobs and businesses are really in danger now and that's really bad for our local economy. >> the swiss franc is at an all- time high against the euro. a new study shows that 1000 hotels across the swiss south are threatened with closure. >> there have been job cuts. each of the hotels have already had to cut back on jobs. we have cut two positions. >> hotel owners are looking anxiously to the government for solutions. so far, in vain. an attempt by the swiss national bank to buy out euros and slow down the rise of the swiss fra
much, much harder on the diplomatic front with afghanistan, pakistan, and the rest of the region. >> i think a formal accord would be desirable, i agree entirely. even so, it would probably be a fig leaf rather than an actual settlement to the problem there. if we don't get it or can't get it, that shouldn't stop us from going away. >> one of the things you point out in the piece which i thought was very striking was that there was all this opposition and huge intense opposition in this country to the bombing of cambodia because that was seen as crossing an international border. of course, we do that every week now in our drone attacks in pakistan which is it functionally exactly the same thing? pakistan has become a safe haven just as cambodia was and we follow in hot pursuit as it were. >> anyone who's watched a war movie, when you have a tactical retreat, you leave one guy behind to cover and shoot. the other people go away. that's what you have to do militarily on the ground even as we're pulling out our forces, we should be striking hard and aggressively so the enemy can't follow
data move fearlessly through the clouds means more than ever. >>> pakistan is detaining a doctor suspected of working with the cia in an elaborate ruse. it was reportedly designed to get dna samples from people inside the compound where it turned out osama bin laden was living. joining us now from islamabad, resa saya. walk us through what happened here. this is a pretty intriguing spy story, if you will. what happened? >> reporter: yeah, it's a fascinating glimpse, look, at the lengths the cia was going to find the location of bin laden in abbottabad. a pakistani security official is telling us the pakistani doctor is in custody suspected of helping the cia set up an intricate plot to confirm the whereabouts of osama bin laden. according to this official he set up a free vaccination campaign to offer a free vaccination to the people of abbottabad where bin laden's compound was located. this doctor hired two nurses going around town from house to house, the plan towas to find t bin laden kids, to match their dna with the dna of bin laudedl sister who passed away in massachuset ma
panetta visited in afghanistan. he failed to visit pakistan. what do you think that says about the tension? >> the tension is quite high. frankly unless there is some reversal and lowering of the rhetoric, then i think it's going to spin in a very deep decline. that's not something that's in pakistan's interest on the united states. you need to keep conversations as private as possible sending very strong messages but if we continue to vent our frustrations mutual frustrations ours with the pakistanis and what they have done and fail to do theirs with us in terms of us trying to micro manage what they're doing, then your going to have a break or breach in that relationship. pakistan is a major non-nato ally. allies don't allow things to happen like the hosting of the con sealing of bin laden or the arresting of those who help take bin laden down or allegedly the targeting for assassination of a journalist who's been critical of the regime. these are not the acts of allies. we've got to get back to a level of respect and trust i think that's lacking right now. as a result the relationship i
, section, none of the funds made available by this act may be used to provide assistance to pakistan. the chair: the gentleman is recognized for five minutes on his amendment. mr. rohrabacher: mr. chairman, again i rise in support of my amendment which stake states, as you have just heard, no funds in this bill may go to pakistan. pakistan is a country on which we have spent billions and billions of dollars. we've given them $18 billion just since 9/11. not to mention the many billions of dollars we gave them during the cold war. what is all that spending achieved for the people of the united states? pakistan is now the best friend to america's worst enemies. radical islam and, yes, an emerging and belligerent china. wake up, america. was anyone really surprised to find osama bin laden was living in a luxurious mansion in plain view in a military-dominated pakistani city? let me admit that i was even surprised that the pakistani government was so bold, so openly in contempt of the people of the united states as to arrest five of its citizens for helping us bring to justice osama bin
're going to find out what pakistan's top spy is now doing here in the united states and whether it will help the relationship get any better. [ male announcer ] to the seekers of things which are one of a kind. the authentic, the rare, the hard to define. to those always searching for what's pure and what's real from we who believe we know just how you feel. haagen-dazs. aflac! oh, i've just got major medical... major medical. ...but it helps pay the doctors. pays the doctors, boyyy! [ quack ] oh yeah? what about your family? ♪ we added aflac, so we get cash! it's like our safety net... ♪ to help with the mortgage or whatever we need! so my family doesn't feel the pain too. ha! [ male announcer ] help protect your family at aflac.com. [ pigeons ] heyyy! hooo!!! it's schwab at your fingertips wherever, whenever you want. one log in lets you monitor all of your balances and transfer between accounts, so your money can move as fast as you do. check out your portfolio, track the market with live updates. and execute trades anywhere and anytime the inspiration hits you. even depo
that have fallen -- followed the killing of osama bin laden in pakistan and the more recent mumbai attacks that have again refocused indian attention on terrorism. but terrorism is an issue which is not exactly an issue of full convergence between the u.s. and india. there are differences between the countries. when hillary clinton discusses this issue with her indian counterpart, there will certainly be differences that will need to be sorted out. >> very briefly, tell us how america's approach to india changed with the rise of china. this is something you've written about. >> china is an important factor, but not one that is publicly discussed. but it is a subtext in the u.s.- india relationship. china becomes more and more assertive as it picks territorial fights with india and its other neighbors, and also begins to exert its influence in the south china sea, claiming the south china sea to be part of its historical borders and thereby infringing on u.s. interests in that seat. there is great room for u.s. and indian collaboration in insuring peace, stability, and more in asia. >> we w
after the entire terrorist infrastructure inside of pakistan. >>dave: are we taking our eye off the ball? all we hear about is al qaeda? panetta and general petraeus saying we close to finishing them off. is that a public perception? >>guest: i'm concerned by the fact they do recite that there is a war on al qaeda and there are other groups like the indian mujaheddin who is in the to be a front for l.e.t. which operates openly in pakistan. a vast array of groups with the same ideology of al qaeda and we have to go after them just as much. >>dave: what role did pakistani play in this and are they our friend or foe? >>guest: the l.e.t. operate a huge infrastructure in magazine stage and bragged they have 200 facilities operating in pakistan and they have charity schools and pakistan does nothing about it. >>dave: and the funding of the military, we have cut off the military funding. is pakistan saying you need to start the money flowing again here? or we will in the help you? >>guest: that is the direction they are moving. i expect a rise in the attacks in afghanistan or to bring that mess
insurgents in pakistan and it shows more than a dozen men believed to be pakistani policemen lined up. there they are, against the backdrop of the hillside with their hands tied behind their backs facing several men with rifles on the right side of your screen. this man shouting is accusing them of killing children in a crime against islam. and there they are, the men opening fire. now we froze the video right there because if you continue to watch, it gets even more graphic, even more brutal from that point on. c nrks nr cnn's reza sayah is taking up from here. >> reporter: we warn you, this is explicit video, some of you may find this very disturbing, if you want to turn away, this is a good time to do so. we want to walk you through the video, it shows at least 14 men lined up, all of them wearing traditional pakistani garb, all of them appear to have their hands tied behind their back. we assume these are taliban fighters, one of them is scolding the man who are lined up, saying that these executions are about to take place in revenge for six children allegedly executed by pakista
-qaida network was angry and frustrated by the cia campaign in the tribal areas of pakistan and achieving the objective to take senior operatives off of the battlefield and keep the group under pressure so it is difficult for operatives to plan, train and raise money. uma, it is no coincidence that we are starting an identical campaign in yemen. yemen is one of the rising threatt hubs and americans are front and center in al-awaki who i describe is leader of al-qaida 2.0. he was overlooked in a key player in the al-qaida network. why was he not taken seriously? >> one of the things i lay out in the book behind the scene was our . what i showed in interviews and phone records. al-awlaki's contact with the hijackers were evidence of a personful relationship. when he return to the pentagon in 2002 as part of the outreach to moderate muslims, it was like a thief returnns to the scene of the crime, he was contacted with three of the five hijackers on flight 577 that went in the building. >>> and one of the things that is interesting, you want people to understand that this is not simply a ques
airborne division which is located along the afghanistan border with pakistan. then a discussion about the 2012 presidential campaign with a focus on the grounds an early primary states as well as the republican presidential field. >> today, the dalai lama and vincent harding talk about non violence. they spoke to more than 10,000 people at the university of arkansas discussing osama bin laden's death, the nuremberg trials, the execution of saddam hussein, and the death penalty. >> in the 20th-century, the number of people were killed and three violence, over 200 million. that problem must be solved. there is also exploitation and we should lay down the seat of hatred course watched this discussion this evening at 6:30 on c-span. what's it look back at president nixon's foreign-policy. members of his administration and his son-in-law discussed topics including communism in china, invading north vietnam and the war in the middle east. >> the discussion in the newspapers were nixon's secret plan for peace. rockefeller did not think that nixon had a plan. he comes in after a hard day camp
of the israeli-pakistan commitment. an overhaul of the flood insurance program. live house coverage here at 2:00 here on c-span. >> this weekend on book tv on c-span2 is everything you know about the yoke corral wrong? jeff given tells a different story about wyatt erp and the gang. charles hill looks at the long war of islamism against the international state system. also in manana forever, jose castaneda talks about the problems facing our southern neighbor. and sign up for booktv alert, weekend schedules in your inbox. >> earlier today the number two command for the after gap stan said president obama's troop withdrawal plan doesn't pose significant risk to the counterinsurgency strategy. lieutenant counselor david rodriguez says he doesn't expect violence in afghanistan to start decreasing until next year. from the pentagon earlier today, this is 45 minutes. >> general rodriguez, it's counselor dave lapin at the pentagon. if you're ready to go, i'll introduce you and we'll get started. >> ok, dave, go ahead, thanks. >> thank you. good morning to those here, good evening in afghanistan. i'
sightedness of it gets us in more trouble than anything else. pertaining to pakistan, having grown up there in the earlier years of my life, and it cannot tell you the immense good will that was there for the americans in the 1980's when we were fighting the soviets and freedom fighters of that time. the day the soviets left, the very next day everyone packed up their bags and left. that region was left with the master deal with on its own. come 9/11, all of a sudden they want that place to be fixed. well, no one was there for 13-14 years. we need to have a longer-term view. if we do not do that, there is no way we can solve our problems. thank you and i will listen offline. host: that may be a way to look at the broader question before we wrap up, but the remainder of the middle east long term. guest: this gets to the issue we spoke about earlier about whether the u.s. is going to support the democratic process in the future. i think the caller is right certainly in the case of pakistan and afghanistan. the united states lost sight of the importance of the region after the soviet the
talks, and talk to journalist pam constable about her new book on pakistan. i'm judy woodruff. >> lehrer: and i'm jim lehrer. "washington week" can be seen later this evening on most pbs stations. we'll see you online, and again here monday evening. have a nice weekend. thank you and good night. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: chevron. we may have more in common than you think. >> and by the bill and melinda gates foundation. dedicated to the idea that all people deserve the chance to live a healthy, productive life. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. captioning sponsored by macneil/lehrer productions captioned by media access group at wgbh access.wgbh.org >> this is "bbc world news america." funding for this presentation is made possible by the freeman foundation of new york, stowe, vermont, and honolulu. newman's own foundation. and union bank. ♪ >> union bank has put i
and we do speaking and we help christians that are being persecuted in countries like pakistan. and we help christians who are suffering all throughout the middle east. >> how do you do that? >> none of your business. >> none of your business? that's interesting. our investigation continues tomorrow night, right? what are we going to see tomorrow? >> yeah. tomorrow, how he makes a business out of his expertise, how these donations to his cause end up with a so-called foundation owned by his business partner. and also the bigger question, anderson, why are our taxpayers going to pay this guy? he can say whatever he is wants. but where are the people vetting these so-called terrorism experts that are suddenly making a lot of money in this country? >> that's interesting. drew, fascinating. we'll continue to follow up. we'll have that report part two tomorrow. thanks, drew, a lot >>> coming up, you may not have been following the war in libya recently. but tonight you are going to get as close to the come bats as anyone can. our ben wedeman and his crew caught in the crossfire today litera
afghanistan, pakistan. you're reading a couple pieces in the "new york times." now it's spreading to all of these different countries and one that really jumped off the page for me, drone attacks in somalia. >> joining us, jeremy scahill, on the cia secret sites in somalia, jeremy, the secret training programs and secret prisons out of somalia is part of your reporting there. how big a threat are these terrorist group there's? >> we should say first of all president obama campaigned on a promise to go up against these bush era policies declaring war on the world, running secret sites, torturing prisoners. deeply involved in an underground dungeon officially run by the somali national security agency, but their salaries are paid by the cia directly. in fact, one somali agent described thousand hairli ed ho and paid by u.s. agents and the u.s. is interrogating prisoners, including those rendered by the kenyan government, snatched off the streets in nairobi based on u.s. intelligence and taken to this secret prison and interrogated. it goes against the president's ordered he signed in janua
persecuted in places like pakistan, and we help christians who are suffering throughout the middle east. >> how do you do that? >> none of your business. >> isn't it anyone's business that donates to you? >> of course. but, you see, a lot of the times, if you disclose information of who you are helping, it ends up biting them. >> reporter: he leads us to his manager who was down the hall selling the anti-islam books. when cnn had questions about the high ranks on the board of advisers, he said to get the number from davies. >> can you tell us who they are? >> off the top of my head, yes. let me see. i am trying to think. the names have gone blank. they will come back to me in a second. major general -- ah, i can't -- the four-star -- there was a three-star general at the air force, irish name, thomas -- i usually know these by hearts. >> reporter: davies did come up with one name, a pilot but no contact details despite repeated requests from cnn. we made calls to the individual anyway, but he never called us back. the group's public tax forms lists only davies and a real estate develope
certainly hurt the al-qaeda terrorist organization, in pakistan and afghanistan. but anwar al-awlaki is alive and well in yemen and he is planning additional attacks against americans. is the franchise there now the lead in al-qaeda and how dangerous and what can we do? >> al-qaeda is somewhat diffuse in the islamist most of the time. yemen a fertile ground. it does seem to be emerging as headquarters of sorts. yemen as a state doesn't exist right now. it was an iffy topic when it had a president but it essentially doesn't right now. so al-qaeda finding an open door. president obama came out and said the tide of war is receding but nobody gave that message to the islamist terrorists. we this had the christmas day bombing, not the one on the flight but the on other one on fed ex shipments. >> gregg: speaking of terrorists let's talk about libya and moammar khadafy who says he is willing to talk to america but he refuses to give up his position. so what is the point of talking to the guy? >> this has been going for five months. people have said that khadafy is losing or close to
revealed while holed up in pakistan, bin laden encouraged direct plots to attack americans and u.s. interests it in europe late last year. bin laden was killed in a u.s. raid at his pakistani compound back in may. >>> looks like a scene out of a horror movie, but this is just one example of today's desperate times. these folks are running because they need help paying for a place to live. we will explain next. [ barks ] ♪ [ cat meows ] ♪ [ whistles ] ♪ [ cat meows ] ♪ [ ting! ] [ male announcer ] travelers can help you protect the things you care about and save money with multi-policy discounts. are you getting the coverage you need and the discounts you deserve? for an agent or quote, call 800-my-coverage or visit travelers.com. personal pricing now on brakes. tell us what you want to pay. we do our best to make that work. deal! my money. my choice. my meineke. >>> for the first time until five years, dallas county handed out section 8 rental vouchers to help those with low to no income get housing, and this was the scene. take a look at this. crowds estimated at about 5
into the gulf of oman, towards pakistan. it is very important. these two monarchies have done everything possible to crush any sign or effort of reform or agitation for reform. in the case of the saudi arabia, there were quite successful in doing this. some of the liberal saudis tried to have a so-called day of raids on march 11. -- a so-called day of rage on march 11. exactly one person showed up in riyadh. that person was swamped by journalists. but 17,000 people had signed up on the facebook page to come out and participate in the day of rage. some shiites in the eastern province show that the day before and had their demonstration. but, basically, the saudis have been able to mobilize not only the threat of security forces cracking down on anybody who demonstrates, the got the religious establishment making any kind of demonstrations religiously forbidden. they put pressure on families to keep their kids at home. and they succeeded. in the case of bahrain, it was much more messy, and you have a shiite majority there of 70% may become a 65% to 75%. and they were on their way to probab
campaign been ongoing in pakistan and some cases yemen, we've taken out something like 1200 fighters from al qaeda including senior leaders. jon: right. >> this is all good news. but again the ideology of radical islam lives on and so do these affiliate groups. that is the challenge ahead of us. jon: if you take out those leaders, and we have been very successful in doing that, if you take out people who have experience going back to the russian-afghan war, take out the people who know how to motivate and organization and maybe build a bomb be, pretty soon you're left with bunch of 18, 20-year-old kids who may have the desire but don't necessarily have the knowledge to continue terrorism campaign? >> well, you know i think you could make that argument but you could also argue you have a number of people who gained experience in afghanistan. people who have gained experience and by the way, fighting in this more recent war, not in the war in the 1980s against the soviets. but rather fighting against the united states and allied forces. you have people that have had experience in iraq and o
and pakistan, both nuclear nations, longtime rivals. those talks just resumed in recent months. >>> u.s. officials have now acknowledged they met with members of moammar gadhafi's regime. the meeting took place last saturday. the u.s. has not said where it happened. but three senior u.s. diplomats were involved, and they say they delivered a clear and firm message, gadhafi must step down. >>> another giant dust storm in arizona. take a look. a wall of dust, again, rolled through phoenix yesterday, about 3,000 feet high. it cut visibility to under a quarter of a mile. some airline flights were delayed. a similar storm hit phoenix just two weeks ago, july 5th. >>> and the u.s. women's soccer team is back home this morning. thousands of fans greeted them as they rolled in to times square. they lost in a heartbreaker, as you know, to japan on sunday. a game that helped set a global twitter record of over 7,000 tweets a second. including marysol castro's. >> yes. >> who joins us now with weather. mary, good morning. >> i can't help it. the yankees or really good sporting events. kudos to b
she is encouraged by talks between india and pakistan. both nuclear nations and long time riflvals. >>> u.s. acknowledge they met with gadhafi's regime a meeting that took place last saturday. the u.s. has not said where it happened. three senior u.s. diplomats were involved. they said they gave a clear message gadhafi must step down. >>> "atlantis" heading home for the last time this this morning. it undocked from the international space station and took photo of its fly-around. it is scheduled to land on thursday which ends 30 years of shuttle missions. >>> u.s. women's soccer team back home this morning. hundreds of fans greeted them as they rolled into times square. they lost in a heartbreaker to japan on sunday. a game that, by the way, help set a global twitter record of over 7,000 tweet thanks to much. that is your latest weather. good morning. i'm not trying to move cities to different state. i'm just a little sleepy. >> raleigh would be beautiful no matter what state it's in. >> exactly. >> you're a very powerful woman so not saying you couldn't do it if you tried. thank y
. what was his connection to pakistan? there are so many unanswered questions about his overseas connections and what he was really doing and his radicalization during the process in which the military did nothing. and finally, the information the joint terrorism task force had about mr. al laak can i and communications with major hasan at fort hood. why wasn't it shared with general cohen at fort hood when it could have stopped the murder of 13 soldiers? jon: a lot of questions there. let's hope you get answers. congressman, thank you. >> i appreciate it. alisyn: here's what is happening now. joint chiefs chairman admiral mike mullen giving a briefing on the wars in iraq and afghanistan and the defense department budget as the military faces questions about the mounting cost of american involvement in the libyan conflict as well. national security correspondent jennifer griffin live from the pentagon for us. jennifer, what did we learn from this briefing? >> reporter: alisyn, he didn't really speak about the libyan conflict for or the cost of it. discussion was with the pentagon
in vietnam, and a lot of the ways of the fight now, the india- pakistan war which defines what is going on in the subcontinent now. even at the end of his career and of his life, 1994, he was still in the game. he was still thinking strategically, and to him, the cold war, the effects of the cold war still were not over. he was concerned about russia, and his thesis was communism is dead in warsaw, but democracy has not yet won, and for that reason he was traveling back and forth to russia, worried about whether gorbachev or yeltsin was speaking on that topic. he got a call from president clinton, they had a conservation -- conversation about clinton's russia policy, and you could see how his policy changed along with the advice that was given by richard nixon. as i see it, that is the essence of the man. i would like to conclude by going back to senator dole's look cheap. he talks about the last sign he saw president nixon, at a luncheon held in the capital honoring the 25th anniversary of his first inaugural. president nixon stood and delivered a speech, capturing the global seen as o
, the india-pakistan war, which still defiance in many ways what is going on in the subcontinent now. even at the end of his career, end of his life, in 1994, he was still in the game. he was still thinking strategically. to him, the cold war -- the effects of the cold war still were not over. he was concerned about russia. his basic thesis was communism is dead in russia, but democracy has not yet won. for that reason he was traveling back and forth to russia, worried about the leaders in russia, speaking on the topic. he gets a call from president palin ton. they had a conversation about clinton's russia policy. you can see in the squept months clinton russian policy change along the advice that was given by richard nixon. that is, as i see it, the essence of the man. i would like to conclude by going back to senator dole's eulogy. he talks about the last time he saw president nixon at a luncheon held in the capital honoring the 25th anniversary of his first inaugural. without a note, president nixon stood and delivered a compelling speech, captures the global scene and sharing his visio
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